NameMary Emily Anderson , G Grandmother
Birth19 Feb 1881, Salisbury Street, Christchurch [6]
Death30 Jun 1949, Mangere
Death1949, Onehunga, Auckland
Birth1881, Christchurch
FatherWilliam Warner Anderson (1855-1925)
MotherCharlotte Webb (1857-1934)
Spouses
1Alfred Trevelian Sneyd , G Grandfather
Birth19 Dec 1864, Glamorgan
Death25 Jun 1938, McIntyre Road, Auckland [7]
FatherBenjamin Sneyd (ca1843-1871)
Marriage1 Dec 1900, Tokatoka [8]
ChildrenEdna (1901-1976)
 Alfred Harold (1905-2006)
 Trevelian Winston (1911-1981)
 Annie Jean (1918-1987)
Notes for Mary Emily Anderson
I knew very little about Mary Emily Anderson until October, 2015, when Joanna McKinnon told me all about her research on the Anderson family.

I know now that Mary Emily was descended from two very early Northland settler families, the Andersons and the Webbs. Joanna has unearthed a great deal of information on the descendants of James Anderson, who arrived into Auckland on the “Eastfield” on 12 December, 1857. Her father, William Warner, was born in England (just) and was two years old on the voyage. Her mother, Charlotte Webb, was descended from another early settler family in the north.

Raised in Dargaville (I think), her brother, Harold Anderson, owned the sawmill there. Wedding details in family Bible. Suffered from rheumatoid arthritis? Buried at the Mangere Cemetery. Pop always said that she was born in Dargaville, but her birth certificate shows Christchurch. But her parents were married in Auckland, so I guess they moved around a bit. This agrees with the information from Joanna McKinnon, who says that the Anderson family had a brief sojourn in Christchurch, before returning to the north. Certainly her uncles, grandfather and father had very strong connections with Aratapu and the Dargaville area, so that is essentially where she is from, despite being born in Christchurch.
Notes for Alfred Trevelian (Spouse 1)
In finding out more about the Sneyd family I was lucky to have the help of Heather Mountjoy, who has spent a great deal of time helping me look up births, deaths, etc, both in England and in New Zealand.

Alfred was born in Bath Morriston. District of Llangefelach, Counties of Swansea and Glamorgan, in 1864. (I have a copy of his birth certificate.) However, his father died in 1871 (in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire according to freebmd) and by 1873 his mother had remarried Isaac Martin Bradshaw in the district of St. Saviour, London/Surrey (from freebmd.rootsweb.com). In the 1881 census Alfred is shown living with his mother Margaret and step-father Isaac, a gardener, in Lower Bullingham, Herefordshire.

According to ship records in NZ, A. Sneyd arrived in Auckland on Feb 20th, 1886, on the ship Lady Jocelyn, that left London on Nov 11th, 1885, under Captain Watt. There was (apparently) a report on this arrival in the New Zealand Herald, Feb 22nd, 1886, although I have not seen it. Also on board the Lady Jocelyn was a Thomas Sneyd and his wife, Martha, almost certainly the uncle and aunt of Alfred. (According to Heather Mountjoy, Thomas Sneyd married Martha Robins in 1869 in Swansea). Thomas and Alfred appear on the electoral roll of the Bay of Islands in 1893, living at Mangonui Bluff. Martha died in 1913 aged 68 and Thomas died in Dargaville on 4 Mar 1916 aged 66.

In 1889 Alfred applied for a grant of 30 acres of land, in Block XI of the Kaeo survey district, between Kerikeri and Whangaroa Harbour, up in far north (New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVI, Issue 9373, 24 May 1889, Page 6). The application was approved. I don’t know whether he worked the land (I doubt he did so successfully), or did anything else with it.

In 1892 (New Zealand Herald, Volume XXIX, Issue 8863, 27 April 1892, Page 6) Alfred played cricket for the Auckland Wanderers, against a Rodney side. He made 0 in the first innings, 1 in the second. He bowled nobody out and took no catches. Oh dear. Hardly stellar. However, according to the newspaper report “a bright and beautiful afternoon brought out the fair sex in greater abundance” so maybe it wasn’t entirely a waste for poor Alfred.

In 1895 (New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 9890, 5 August 1895, Page 3) Alfred offered to do some work on the Opanaki road, for an additional £1 (for a total of £7. The original quote was for £6 10s, according to the 18 June, 1895 Herald article). Opanaki was later renamed Kaihu, and is just north of Dargaville, along the West coast.

According to Pop (Alfred’s son, also called Alfred) he was an Engineer. His death certificate says he was a marine engineer, and that he married Mary at Aratapu, which is just south of Dargaville. Nothing now exists of Tokatoka save the name Tokatoka Road (which is right by Arapatu), just across the water, Tokatoka Tavern (which I’ve never visited) and Tokatoka peak, which has a walk up to it.

I can confirm that Alfred was a marine engineer, as the Auckland Star (28 April, 1905) reports that “Mr. A. Sneyd has left the s.s. Ohinemuri to take up the position of engineer on the s.s. Weka which trades between Onehunga and Waiuku. He intends to make his home at Onehunga.”

Another of Alfred’s uncles, Robert, came to NZ with his wife and three sons, and set up a pottery business in Makarewa, just north of Invercargill, around 1884. This met all kinds of resistance, both from the pottery business at Milton, as well as because people didn’t want to buy locally made ware. Robert died in 1892 and his business, then run by his sons Arthur and Charles Frederick, went bankrupt in 1894. Charles Frederick’s wife, Nancy Littlewood Sneyd, was killed in the famous 1901 incident with a signal rocket in Invercargill, and C.F. Sneyd later moved to Kaiapoi. The earliest Sneyd in Kaiapoi was Dryden Henry Sneyd, who came out in 1853 or so, leaving in 1866. Sneyd St. in Kaiapoi is named after him. Dryden was a member of the rich and famous Sneyds. However, the move of Charles Sneyd to Kaiapoi appears to have been merely a coincidence, and there is no connection between D.H. Sneyd and my lot.
Notes for Alfred Trevelian & Mary Emily (Family)
Details in family Bible, but name Tokariko isn’t clear. Furthermore, Alfred’s death certificate says that he was married at Aratapu. That’s very close to Tokatoka.
Last Modified 28 Dec 2015Created 11 Sep 2016 using Reunion for Macintosh